Why Do Dogs Smell Each Others Bottoms? Top 5 Common Dog Questions

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1. Why Do Dogs Smell Each Other’s Bottoms?

We’ve all seen it. When dogs meet this is almost always the first thing they do. So why do they do it? Long story short, it all boils down to their Apocrine glands. Mammals, including humans, have Apocrine glands all over the body but they are concentrated in the armpits, butt and crotch. 

When dogs meet, butt sniffing is the equivalent to humans shaking hands and having a quick chat. A quick whiff and a dog is able to retrieve information such as gender, age, mood, fertility, health, spayed or neutered, friend or foe and if they met previously. Dogs have amazing scent memories in a sense that they can remember the scent of a dog they haven’t seen in a long time. 

Now, since humans also have Apocrine glands, butt sniffing naturally extends to humans as well. This explains why a dog might sniff a stranger’s butt. The dog simply wants to know more about that person. 

 2. Why Does My Dog Follow Me To The Bathroom?

This is one of the greatest mysteries since man walked on earth – Why does my dog follow me to the toilet? You may or may not have noticed, but dogs have zero sense of privacy. Remember, a dog can poop in the middle of a busy intersection so watching his or her favorite person poop isn’t a big deal at all.

Here are some theories behind this mystery:

  1. You accompany them when they do their business so it’s only natural that they accompany you when you do yours. 
  2. Your dog may think the bathroom is a really important territory for you and want to help you protect it because you keep leaving your scent there multiple times a day.  We all know a dog marks its territory by leaving a scent when it pees or poops. 
  3. Dogs have a pack mentality. In the wild, they survive by staying in groups. They follow you everywhere because it makes them feel safer. They instinctively know that pooping puts you in a vulnerable position and want to be there to protect you. 
  4. Dogs have a keen sense of smell. And a typical bathroom has a lot of scents like soap, cleaning products under the sink, shampoo, etc… that your dog may find interesting. 
  5. Your dog likes your company and may simply want to know your whereabouts. 

3.Why Do Dogs Spin Around Before They Poop?

There are many theories as to why dogs do this. One of them is dogs quickly survey the area for predators because pooping puts them in a vulnerable position where they cannot fend themselves if need be.  Another theory says dogs with anxiety issues also have anxiety when pooping in public places. I can’t say I blame them because I’d be anxious too. Some dogs would rather not poop in public places and if you suspect this is the case, take your dog to a quieter area. 

The truth involves the magnetic field around the earth. A team of German researchers studied 70 dogs and discovered that dogs tend to do their business in the north or south direction and avoided facing east or west. They said it may help dogs find that location again if they have to. 

Prior to pooping, dogs also scent a location to learn about other dogs in the area.  A dog can pick up a lot of information from sniffing another dog’s excretions. It’s like checking a dog’s Instagram account. They can pick up information like gender, age, health, what they ate, etc…You know how sometimes people like to post pictures of what they ate? It kind of works like that too. 

The scent also triggers them to go poop. Your dog’s excretions will leave scents that other dogs will pick up on. It’s like their version of social media. 

So next time when you’re standing in the freezing cold with your dog spinning around while trying to find his bearing, resist the temptation to rush your pet to do his business. Now you know what’s going on. 

There’s a 50% probability your dog will poop facing north. 

4. Should I Let My Dog Sleep On My Bed?

It is a personal preference. Almost half of dog owners let their pets sleep on their bed. Women report that it gives them comfort and makes them feel more secure than with a human partner. 

Will It Affect The Quality Of My Sleep?

Without question, yes it will. Dogs have different sleep cycles. They wake up around 3 times an hour and any movements can disturb your sleep whether you realize it or not. Dogs are always on alert for sounds making them light sleepers. 

Some dogs like to sleep horizontally like our Labradoodle, Watson. I can’t tell you how many times I almost fell off the bed. Now he sleeps on the couch. 

Is It Safe To Let My Dog Sleep On My Bed?

This is actually a question that your dog should be asking you because 2 out of 3 human diseases are Reverse Zoonotic meaning they can be transmitted to animals. If you and your dog are relatively healthy and your pet gets his regular anti-parasite treatments then it should be fine. Monitor for allergies. 

A Few Things To Consider

  1. It may be unsafe for dogs with mobility issues to get on and off your bed.
  2. Elderly dogs may suffer from incontinence and have accidents on your bed. 
  3. Puppies that haven’t been potty trained may also have accidents on your bed.

Remember to change bedding covers regularly

Letting your dog sleep on your bed may cause separation anxiety. If your dog is suffering from this then it’s better to let your pet sleep in a different room. 

Doing this will teach your dog that it’s safe to be disconnected from you for periods of time. If your dog is already used to sleeping on your bed, do this gradually and use lots of motivation. 

5. Why Do Dogs Scoot Their Bottoms?

If you’ve seen your dog do this and you’re wondering why dogs drag their bottom along the floor, you may want to know the reason behind this bizarre act.  There are a couple of possible reasons for this but more often than not, it’s because their anal glands need to be expressed or emptied.

dog scooting along the floor dragging his butt

Anal glands are also known as anal sacs and is located just inside the anus and contain one of the foulest-smelling fluids known to man.  Dogs naturally empty their anal glands whenever they do their business but sometimes they lose this ability. Dogs drag their butt along the floor because they experience irritation.  Another indication is when you see a dog licking it’s butt or chewing his tail.

 If you’re feeling adventurous and want to save a few bucks, you can express your dog’s anal gland yourself. In my opinion, some things are better left to the professionals. Call your vet to have it cleaned. 

Not doing it the proper way may lead to an impacted anal gland. If you see your dog acting strangely like having trouble sitting down, it could be an infection or rupture of the anal gland. Your vet can check for this as well. Prevent this by adding some fiber to your dog’s diet. 

Probiotics may also help. 

Another possible reason could be parasites. Worms in particular. Aside from scooting their butt along the floor or carpet, other symptoms to look out for are diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, anemia, dull coat, and a “potbelly”. Prevent parasites by having their stool examined every year. 

If you’re getting a dog, have it checked out by a vet before you take it home to prevent exposing your family to parasites. 

I hope you found this article to be useful! Please share it with fellow dog owners who may want to know the answers to these common dog questions.

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All information in this article is for educational purposes only and is not meant to replace your veterinarian’s advice.

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125 thoughts on “Why Do Dogs Smell Each Others Bottoms? Top 5 Common Dog Questions”

  1. quite an intriguing and mind-blowing answer should be given to this quite frequently asked questions about dogs, i have a dog named Jimmy and I always wondered My DogFollow Me To The Bathroom? and I’m glad I found the answer here on your website. The fact that he wants to protect me everywhere I go demonstrates once again that dogs are man’s best and most loyal friends. I didn’t know that they follow the scent of soap and even the previous days I dropped some shampoo on the floor and he came close to smelling it…

    I’m so glad that I stumbled, upon this article henceforth I wouldn’t need to bother myself when my dog displays these habits…

    Reply
  2. This article is very interesting since it analyzes the relationship between dog and man. The fact that the dog is accompanied to the bathroom or the sensitivity of smell and that there is a logical explanation is very accommodating.
    On the other hand, I am more convinced after reading this article that it is not convenient for dogs to sleep in bed with us.
    Thank you for providing and sharing this information.

    Reply
  3. It’s quit an education for me.I really didn’t know dogs and human beings share so much in common.
    Just like we don’t forget someone we have been introduce to , so are dogs. We just have a different way of introduction and that is cool. They lift their tails to offer and invitation and we offer a smile or a hand shake. Still don’t want a dog sleeping in my bed but now I understand why others do it.
    I guest we are not so different after all.
    I really enjoy this article. Thank you.

    Reply
  4. It’s quit an education for me.I really didn’t know dogs and human beings share so much in common.
    Just like we don’t forget someone we have been introduce to , so are dogs. We just have a different way of introduction and that is cool. They lift their tails to offer and invitation and we offer a smile or a hand shake. Still don’t want a dog sleeping in my bed but now I understand why others do it.
    I guest we are not so different after all.
    I really enjoy this article. Thank you.

    Reply
  5. Very entertaining and insightful article you have written. Now, its been a few decades for me, but the only thing my dog did was to sleep on my bed with me. I was in high school and I was a buff guy. I weighed 230lbs. My dog was a Doberman/German Shepard so he weighed about 90lbs. And I slept on a twin bed…Wait it gets worse. I also had a cat and both of them didn’t like each other and he also slept on the bed. My cat by my head, my dog by my feet. I remember having a few rough nights of sleep when they were both snoring and spreading out their bodies. Sometimes I would wake up and yell, “Off the bed!” They would just look at me like they were saying, “What’s his problem.” Then go back to sleep. I just dealt with it. They were were my kids after all.

    Reply
  6. These are four topics that have many of us humans wondering and it was an entertaining read from start to finish. It shows that every strange, mysterious habit in animals has a true meaning and while they might be strange to us, for dogs, they’re normal. I’ve often wondered about a dog’s sleeping pattern, as every dog I’ve ever known personally has that common denominator – they’re light sleepers. What I didn’t know was how often they woke up per hour. 

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  7. Yes I did find it helpful thanks to you. You’re essentially a myth busters here with the answered questions. I am very glad that you can tell me here more about my dog. I didn’t realise why he usually drags on the floor. I sure do not want to have a feel of the foul smell you mentioned already. Thank you for giving good information here. Cheers!

    Reply
  8. Hello there! You’ve got an amazing article here. I sincerely I’ve learnt a lot from it since I’ve been reading it, I practically went over it again for clearer understanding. Good job!

    Surprising, I got the answer to my question about dog not having any sense of privacy. 

    Thanks for sharing this, it’s really helpful!

    Reply
  9. I don’t have a dog, but I have many friends and family that do.  I really like this post as it answers some very real questions.  I didn’t know that smelling each others bottoms was the equivalent of a hand shake.  Found that interesting and following you to the bathroom. lol  well it does make sense when we take them out to do their business.  I will be passing along your website address to some dog owners I know will just love it.  

    Reply
  10. I wish someone talk about this one day and i found out here that is amazing because i was dying to know why dog do all these stuff and i know it now, yes that is right dog have zero sense of privacy because they don’t think that is a bad thing if you do it in front of people but god create them like that.

    Thanks for your post.

    Reply
  11. Wow, this is an amazing article. I always wondered Why Does My Dog Follow Me To The Bathroom? and I’m glad I found the answer here on your website.
    The fact that he wants to protect me everywhere I go demonstrates once again that dogs are man’s best and most loyal friends. I didn’t know that they follow the scent of soap and even the previous days I dropped some shampoo on the floor and he came close to smelling (fortunately he didn’t lick it, hehe). Hope to see more posts like this!

    Reply
  12. I have never thought about the first theory but it makes so much sense to me. Dogs are often reminded of what their owners do to them, whether is taking them outside, feeding them, petting them, etc and it could be possible that they feel like they also have that responsibility towards you and what you’ve done for them. Very interesting theories to think about! 

    Reply
  13. Hi, I enjoyed reading your article on Why Do Dogs Smell Each Others Bottom?  Top 5 Common Dog Questions.  There’s a lot of helpful and interesting information.  

    I love dogs and actually have two dogs.  I have seen one of them smell the other’s bottom.  I did not know that mammals and humans have the apocrine glands all over the body until I read your article.  It’s amazing how a dog’s scent memory can remember another dog’s scent that they haven’t seen in a long time.

    Thank you for sharing a great article,

    Margaret

    Reply
  14. Amazing article I’m must say. My Dog does this all the time, I really love the aspect that talks about smelling and its definitely saying the true fact. The idea on your post is amazing but I really need an answer to why my dogs sniff the oldest when give an attention to it. Thanks for an amazing article looking forward to an answer to my question. 

    Reply
  15. So many questions that so many of us ask ourselves but no one really knows the answers to them, until now that is! Your article is so funny and yet informative, I’m really glad I found your website and I’ll be browsing other posts hoping to learn more about our little friends. Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply
  16. After reading these facts, i can totally understand why Dogs smell each other’s bottoms. They don’t actually talk, and i don’t think they use telepathy, so it makes sense that they would use their strong sense of smell to get to know who they’re dealing with. Now I can’t wait for someone to ask me that question!

    Reply
  17. I found it interesting that dogs tend to do their business facing North or South and avoid East and West. I hadn’t heard of this before and now I’m curious to observe if this is true for my dogs.

    One of my dogs had some issues with her anal glands and it started with her scooting across the grass then quickly escalated to her needed to have it lanced and drained. It ended up getting infected and it was not pleasant for her. It happened not long after switching her to a new food so I agree that making sure your dog is getting enough fibre is really important.

    Reply
  18. Hi! First of all I have to praise your post- what a delightful reading you presented, I mean I literally ate it, and now you answered to a couple of my questions: I have a deer pinch ( like a terrier sized pinch, with a lot of energy and stamina), and I never understood why does it chase its tail and then when it finally catches it, it starts to bite it – I thought that it didn’t know why is a tail there or something like that. Thank you so much!

    Cheers,

    Primoz P.

    Reply
  19. You must have been watching my dogs with a camera when you wrote this.  My dogs do all of these things and I love you theories about the poop smelling and circling.  I think the magnetic field idea is very cool and probably has some deep truth to it.  Maybe you can offer a theory as to why one of my dogs will snif our oldest dogs butt when we go to give it attention or pet her?  He does not do it with the other dog just the older one.  Go figure!  Love this site!

    Reply
  20. Hey there,

    Great article! This really answered some questions that I have. One of my dogs tries to follow me into the bathroom and just sits there when I leave the door open. When I leave he’ll try and lick to toilet bowl. I always figured that he just loves the smell. “Zero sense of of privacy is right! “It’s like their social media.” This article was so humorous!

    Reply
  21. This has been one of the most informative articles I’ve ever read in regard to why dogs do certain things. My dogs and my friend’s dogs do all of the 5 questions you listed and answered, though I don’t let my dogs sleep in my bed. I had always wondered why dog smell each other’s butts and you answered it perfectly. Now I’ve seen some dogs not only smell, but also lick another dog’s butt. Is it basically doing the same thing as if they were sniffing and wanting to say hello?

    Reply
  22. Hi.  Thanks for this amazing post on these dog activities.  I have noticed most of them.  We had one dog in the past that would tap one foot about 4 to 8 times as he squatted to poop.  our current dog, Toby will go crazy with doorbells, thunder.  He will run and look out the window if we are near the window.  They are pretty smart.  If we are getting our luggage ready, he starts pacing and going towards the door with a little whine.  But if we are gearing up for a workout at the gym, he won’t get off his bed.  Hmmm, somebody is not interested in working out.  Its just funny how they know whats up.  LOL

    Reply
  23.  I never knew any of this information about dogs. Reading this has made me realize that I think my dog is having the separation anxiety. I am trying to better train my dog and doing it in smaller increments seams the way to go. It makes perfect sense now why he keeps following me everywhere along with all the other abnormal behaviors don’t seem as abnormal now that I understand why they are doing it, Thanks for sharing

    Reply
  24. To be honest, these are questions I have found myself asking on more than one occasion! I think the most fascinating one for me is why dogs scoot on their bottoms. I figured there was some irritation going on, but just what kind, I had no clue! I am with you, though, in that I would much rather the professionals take care of expressing the anal gland than saving a little money and doing it myself. No thank you! Great post!

    Reply
  25. Hi!  Thanks for answering all these common mysteries surrounding dogs!  I am more of a cat expert than a dog expert, but I have owned dogs when I was a kid and often care for my mother’s dogs when I was closer to home.  I actually DID know the butt-sniffing thing, which by the way, cats do it to each other too.  Though rarely with humans.  Cats also follow people to the bathroom too.  I personally believe it is more of a ‘hang out with my favorite human’ type of thing and not necessarily to protect us.  Though my cat does think she needs to yowl at me to save me from the shower!  Excellent article, thank you.

    Reply
  26. I feel like this really helps me understand my dog so much more! Sometimes I get so annoyed with him following me around everywhere, but knowing that he feels it’s safe because of the pack mentality is so enlightening. The spinning was especially interesting as my dog does that frequently!! This was an extremely insightful article! 

    Reply
  27. This is an article that’s enjoyable to read and needs to be shared with our friends on social media. I enjoyed reading and got a good dose of laughter.

    I think we should not let dogs sleep on our beds for the reason that if you have a partner of the opposite sex, you will be in trouble. It can be a pain trying to get your dog out of the room if the two of you want to have sex, it can get in the way of enjoying the love. So, better train your dog to sleep in another room and not in your own room.

    Reply
  28. These are all very important things to consider when thinking about dogs and how they are thinking about meeting other dogs and having territory for other humans. Do you think that dogs mean to do the things they do and that it is all they know or do they think that it is a healthy habit to keep doing? What is your favorite dog habit?

    Reply
  29. Hello; why do dogs smell each other’s bottom? Very interesting topic. I often notice the action but never take it into consideration. I look at the action lightly as some dogs blush when other dogs smell at their bottom while some lift their tail as a welcome move. 

    I would not allow any of my dogs to get unto my bed. Before Butcher has company she would hide under the bed in the evenings, and at night when I awoke I found her on the bedside mat, it had never been easy to get her out of the room then.

     She now has two other dogs to share her company, however, I talk to her and she showed signs of understanding. She does things that I understand she is saying things to me which I respond to her verbally. 

    I found dogs to be amazing creatures. I always wonder why dogs pull their bottom along the ground and conclude that it could be itching them. Your post has assured me the reason.

    Dorcas

    Reply
  30. What a nice article it is! Thank you very much for this kind of article. Trough you post I have gained a lot of new knowledge. It is really helpful for me. I have two dogs at my room. I always think about themselves. They are like my family members. All my family member like them. 

    Five common dog question helped me to know a lot of new thought. You told us all the answer in detail. truly I have never think about these question. But by reading your article I have a new experience. Your review is helpful for me. Thank you again for this kind of educative post.  

    Reply
  31. I really appreciate this article. Thank you so much for sharing this interesting article with us. I see my neighbor’s dogs smelling beneath one another, why do dogs smell beneath one another? This question pondered me and I would ask myself the rest of the questions. I never asked anyone to think that everyone would laugh at me. As you know through this post, I feel good knowing the answers to these questions and again thank you .

    Can I share this post with my social media? Hopefully those who don’t know the answer to this question will benefit.

    Reply
  32. Hello Sonny,

    You just made me realize that I have been wrong all this while, I used to think I understand dogs emotion. I see them smell the others butt a lot, but never new it was an exchange of pleasantries; also they smell poo to check each other’s instagram account. Thanks for this simple way of passing this message

    Reply
  33. Hi Sonny

    I  found this article to be very enlightening  and useful at the same time. You often see dogs do them and wonder what they are doing and now I know why. It makes sense as dog senses are much more acute than ours. I always laugh when a strange dog tries to sniff my butt, as I know they are trying to be friendly. You wonder when a dog goes too far and they start acting out of sorts. I find that titbit on why dog in circle before pooing very interesting, but the scientist in me wonders why they will face that direction. The only fact missing is why do dogs start humping your leg?

    Thanks

    Antonio 

    Reply
    • Hello Antonio! 

      Of all the comments I’ve received, Yours was the only one that made me burst out laughing. lol! Thank you!

      Lemme see if the keywords “why does my dog hump my leg” are in jaaxy lo!

      Sunny

      Reply
  34. Hehe, this has been a question of mine for al my life but I have never asked it to anyone, it was nice to finally have the answer and maybe someday I can be helpful to another person asking this question:)

    But it all makes sense now when you think about it, we  humans also react to smells without even thinking about it so there is so natural now when you think about it, and dogs are not ashamed as we are ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  35. I live in a house where the family have an anxious dog so I was intrigued by your site.  I have also by default, the sons are rather lazy, become the main dog walker.  I was intrigued by your question; “Why Do Dogs Smell Each Other’s Bottoms? Yes, I thought, I would like to know!

    So its all down to “Apocrine glands”. It’s the equivalent of “humans shaking hands and having a quick chat. A quick whiff and a dog is able to retrieve information such as gender, age, mood, fertility, health, spayed or neutered, friend or foe and if they met previously. Now that has answered a question I have wanted to know for decades.  And I have asked many people and none have ever told me that. Thank you for that information.

    The dog (A male Pug) I walk is rather nervous.  What can I do to calm him when he meets other dogs?  He will bark aggressively at any other dog, whether it’s a female pug, a Dobberman, a Pit Bulll, a Terrier, he does not hold back. He gets even more nervous with Poodles.  Its amazing, he hasn´t been attacked more often.  Why do nervous dogs bark so much?  I would really like to know. Do you think CBD could help?

    Reply
  36. Hi! I had several of these questions as a child and up to this point I didn’t know the answer to them.

    Thanks for writing a post on these subjects.

    It’s interesting to see how much information our dogs perceive through their smell. And although it’s awkward for us humans, for dogs it’s just the equivalent to stretching hands.

    Concerning our dogs sleeping with us, yeah, It’s not safe. Thanks!

    Reply
  37. Why do dogs smell each other bottoms?  Is a very nice article i must say! dogs smell each other or people around them to know their scent to able them familaries  with their sounding .and dogs looking around often before Pooping for security reasons is true so true i love everything about these inside about dogs life.. Thank you 

    Reply
  38. Great question! I had no idea that this type of behavior is due to the location Apocrine glands and helps the dog to determine things like gender, age and even mood. Something I admire about dogs is their lack of caring what people think. Being able to poop in the middle of the street would be quite liberating. Circling before pooping due to the dog checking for predators makes sense and I hadn’t really considered that, and interesting about the magnetic field too. I actually prefer that the dog not sleep on the bed as I enjoy a well-trained dog. I think the anal glands are best left to the vet lol. This is a great post. You answered some interesting questions for sure!

    Reply
  39. Wow in just this report I have already learned a lot about dogs. 

    I never knew why dogs do these until now.

    I love dogs especially puppies, I don’t really know how to care for them but with these posts I am beginning to learn how to. 

    Sooner rather than later I will own a puppy and I will be a good dog parent due to these posts I am learning from. 

    I need to know what breed of dogs I can start with as a novice? 

    Reply
  40. Hi 

    Thank you for sharing this post very interesting and the anxiety i understand our staff has this when my husband comes in she is glued to his side but when i am here she sits as close to me as possible.

    You have very good information on your site it is really good thank you so much for sharing.

    Tracey

    Reply
  41. What a joy to have a dog. My dog will soon be 13 years old and I am already very sad knowing that he will leave us soon..

    But enough of sentimentality.

    Yes you are right, dogs depend a lot on their sense of smell. They know when you met another animal.

    When my dog is with me he follows me everywhere. In the toilet and in the bedroom, there is not a prohibited place for him.

    I like that you have demystified all these questions that we ask ourselves about our favorite animal and also your sense of humor.

    Reply
  42. What an interesting article!  Thanks for putting it together.

    I found that it explains many of the questions I’ve had in easy to understand detail; the act of dogs scooting their bottom had me wondering for a while; I always thought that itching may have had something to do with it.  Coming from a culture where dogs are just animals rather than pets, I seldom paid particular attention to their activities except for the last three years when I’ve cared for a pit bull female dog.  Watching her is just a pleasure because she exhibits a number of interesting behaviors, none of which I’ve found to be aggressive.  Instead, she’s mostly well behaved and has been a quick learner.

    At any rate, thanks for your most informative presentation.

    Hugo.-

    Reply
  43. Hi, 

    l am dog person I like your site very much. The fact that you have the answers for most common questions for dog owners it is amazing. Why do dogs smell each others’ butts?  It has never crossed my mind to know the reason why they do that thanks to your article now I know the reason. Why does my dog follow me to the bathroom?  I always thought it is because she loves to be around me as I can close the door before she enters I will still found her lying on the door way waiting when I go out she goes in first before she follows me again.Why does my dog spin around in a circle l always thought she might be itching now I know l will find her a very nice quite place. It is amazing how you come to answer so many questions about dogs we didn’t know about. Great post.

    Reply
  44. Hello Jerrick

    Your Post has been so eye catching, It made me laugh a lot but at the same time I learned so much especially about the possible cure or relieve for my 14 year old dog that has problems with his anal glands. I will definitely read more about that.

    Do you recommend a probiotic, I would love to get my pet started.

    I sure am glad we humans don’t have a desire to sniff each other!

    Best regard

    Audrey

    Reply
  45. Hello Sonny, I must say that this article is very helpful and informative. I have a male dog and it was very strange to me that he smells every person that comes to my house, it is so annoying and shameful. I am glad I stumbled upon your article because now I learned why he does that. Thank you for sharing such useful information.

    Reply
    • Hello Daniel,

      You are right, it is embarrassing whenever a dog does that. It’s normal for them, though. I’m glad you found this article useful and thanks for commenting

      Sunny

      Reply
  46. I learnt many things while reading and find it very useful . These are some things that have been revolving in my mind whenever I see dogs do them. Now I know why dogs smell stuffs. We had a young pup that used to pee regularly whilst outside playing and we could never figure out whether it was an excitement or anxiety issue. Now I know the dog was probably marking his territory. Very helpful for everyone.

    Reply
  47. Hi there.

    I’m a huge dog person, so I absolutely love your site. The fact that you have the answers to some of the most common and mysterious questions for dog owners in the world, is Awesome! Why do dogs smell eachothers’ butts? Why does my pooch follow me to the bathroom? Why does my dog spin around in a circle before going to the bathroom? I have pondered these questions for years, but not anymore! The world needs to hear these answers!

    Great job!

    Jerrick

    Reply
  48. Sonny,

    Your article on dogs and their nether regions was fascinating.  Some of it I had heard of and some was new.

    I know that dogs can tell much about each other (and us) by sniffing the back end.  I know that dogs check other dogs urination when they are on a walk.  My neighbor refers to it as the dogs checking the pee-mail!

    I was not aware of the directional quality of dogs pooping patterns.  My dog does a very elaborate poopy dance, but I’ve never noticed the directional nature of it.  I will pay attention to it from now on.

    Thanks,

    Ellen

    Reply
    • Hello Ellen,

      I took my dog, Watson out for a walk this afternoon and he did his business facing north. It’s so weird but it’s true!

      🥂Sunny

      Reply
  49. Dogs are very interesting creatures and their habitual way of living definitely makes for a great company. I know the answer to the bottom sniffing the bottom. However the following you to the bathroom is interesting lol. I thought the spin around before they go to the bathroom is just all their innate habits, now I know. Thank yo for sharing this!

    Reply
  50. Hi there,

    First of all thank you for making me smile with sharing such a bizarre and fascinating post. I was hooked from just reading the heading! It never occurred to me to ask the question but I have to admit, the thought has crossed my mind. haha! We just don’t realize what goes through our dogs’ minds sometimes but it is so interesting to know these theories. After you explained it so well in your article, it actually makes a lot of sense now! 

    Reply
  51. Hello, I really want to first appreciate your effort in putting this great website together and writing this article. one strange thing that has always got my attention is when dogs scoot their bottom. i am enlightened right now about this and many other things. i can understand my dog better now.

    Reply
  52. This was a good article with several keen observations about dog behavior and how it can be related to people. I didn’t realize that my dog may circle when about to do her business because she is checking the area for predators and that they may be trying to stay downwind and such. And I agree, as someone who let’s her dog sleep in her bed, it does affect our sleep more than theirs. But the warmth and comfort is worth it. Thanks for the informative article

    Reply
  53. I love dogs, and the truth is that these questions have been asking me a long time ago :).
    I like the fact that I know that dogs can gather a lot of information just by sniffing between them. How many communication problems would end if we humans had the same capacity! (at least at these high levels)

    The other answer that I liked, was that we can have our pets in bed if all is well. It is true that it can be annoying to sleep like this, but nothing cuter than that warmth on cold nights:) …

    I was very surprised that they are looking for magnetic fields! I will try to know a little more about this behavior.

    Thank you very much for giving us the answers to the questions we sometimes have dog fans!

    regards
    Pablo

    Reply
  54. I have become a big fan of your website and I have come back to read this amazing article. I always wondered why dogs sniff each other behind. Now I know its just a way of saying hello and gathering information like whether they have met before.

    Another thing that I found absolutely fascinating, is the fact that a dog is able to remember a scent from another dog if they had met before.

    I found it funny that my dog would like to return the favor by accompanying me when I am going to do my business just like I do for him when he is doing his business, that is so sweet, and that he wants to help me protect my territory.

    From now on I will be gentle when I chase the dog away if he follows me to the bathroom because before I read this article I did not understand the meaning.

    Now I feel terrible because I have been chasing him away sometimes closing the door in his face.

    I will let him know that its OK, to let me go in there alone.

    The business of emptying my dog’s anal glands, I will leave that for the Vet, I would rather pay than perform that task lol ๐Ÿ™‚

    Thank you for this article wow, I have learned a lot.

    Rose.

    Reply
  55. What a wonder article.  I never really knew why dogs sniffed each other bottoms but does make complete sense.  My dogs have always slept with me at night on my bed.  I just can’t say no.  My father always said that when a dog drags his butt across the floor that it meant that it either had worms or their butt itched.  I never believed the worm part of it.  This article really answered a lot questions myself and others have.  You get an A++ for this.  I hope to read more posts like this in the future.  These type of articles really help people to learn about the truths.

    Reply
  56. Haha, well who knew all these interesting things about dogs and their behinds lol?! But honestly, I find it all very fascinating. I recently got a new puppy. She’s a miniature goldendoodle. She is obsessed with “nesting” where she digs at the blankets until she gets them just how she wants. What’s that about? Thanks! 

    Reply
    • Hey Katie! Thanks for commenting. As for nesting, I honestly don’t know why.  Dogs have their own quirks. What I do know, is that Golden Doodles are one of the cutest dogs on planet earth 😊

      Sunny

      Reply
  57. Hey Sonny (AnxiousCanine Admin)!

    Really fantastic article I enjoyed the read.

    Also, I have to say it is a bit funny LOL

    Personally I love dogs and I have always wondered why they do the things they do.

    They are quite the characters to have around.

    I totally resonate with number 2 and number 4 and I agree with you.

    You’re right – we keep them company while they relieve themselves, so it’s only fair if we let them do the same LOL

    But I think its definitely because of their protective instincts and us being in a vulnerable position.

    No wonder dogs have been used in wars and police forces still continue to use them.

    It also explains why they sleep at the foot of our beds or with us, because we’re vulnerable.

    Personally, I don’t sleep with my dogs in my bed because, like you said, it has been proven that doing this can transmit diseases from the pets to the pet owners.

    Anyways, really awesome post.

    I have bookmarked your site and will stay tuned into your future posts.

    Best Regards,

    ~Joshua

    Reply
  58. Sonny,

    I’m a huge dog fan, and I have a Dog named Buckis, so topics such as this intrigue me very much. I must admit two of these questions on this post, I have asked myself. The first question I have asked myself is, why does my dog follow me to the bathroom. And I fully agree and am enlightened thanks to you why this happens. My dog, Buckis, would always try to follow me and have to tell him, “NO.” 

    It makes total sense since dogs take nature poops and such in the open because it’s normal for them. And the “pack mentality” in dogs you mentioned is astonishing! You’re right because my dog always follows me everywhere! 

    Question number 4: Should I Let My Dog Sleep On My Bed? I have pondered this question as well because one-time Buckis (my dog) went found early morning on my bed. It turns out Buckis left his doggy bed to join me on my memory foam bed. But now I am aware that Buckis needs to sleep in a separate room in his doggy bed, so he doesn’t develop separation anxiety. Thanks, Sonny, for this helpful information!

    Reply
    • Hey Josh, Im really glad you learned a few things from this article. And thanks for sharing your story. Maybe buckis wanted to try out your memory foam bed

      Sunny

      Reply
  59. Interesting article on dog behavior and your explanations thereof. It shows you know your stuff very well. Personally I had noticed all of this behavior, but thought nothing of it and regarded just as belonging to a dog. So, now I know better thanks to your blog. The one that blew my mind was the fact that women report feeling more comfortable with a dog sleeping beside them than with a human partner! I grew up without dogs and even now there is no dog or any pet in our house. Therefore this has been quite an eye-opener.

    Reply
  60. I went on and on in a comment on your page so I will spare you in this one…Great site !

    I related to your content on the behavior of dogs having grown up with Black labs and you nailed it!

    You obviously must have dogs as you show that knowlegde easily!

    I had a few questions off topic but about your site:

    Why no comment links? You could onetize them, no?

    How do you get ads between comments on the post page? I think is was very catching! If I wasn’t already a clickfunnel member I would have hit that!~

    How to get ads on the right side banner? with that cool scroll locking feature? Is that a Plugin? or just Mad web designing skills, or part of the Theme?

    I really appreciate all your content as I am sure many dog owners will be as well.

    Great job, Great Article, great site too!

    Thank You

    ~Jason

    Reply
    • Hello Jason, thanks for the kind words! I really appreciate it.

      I’ve never heard of comment links. What are they?

      The ads are set automatically by Google. There’s a plugin, though, if you want to insert them manually. I think it’s called Ad inserter. I’m deliberating whether to remove the ads altogether because I’ve been having issues with site-speed and I suspect those Google ads are the main culprit. 

      As for the sticky banners, it’s a plug-in called Q2W3 Fixed Widget. I honestly think everybody has to use it to maximize ad exposure. When you download it, set the parameters. On settings, I set the Top Margin at 10 and the Bottom Margin at 1060 but it depends on your setup. 

      As for the banners itself, those are creatives that I got from the company i’m affiliated with.

      There are a couple of ways to insert a banner on the side-bar. On dashboard ->Appearance -> Widgets, you can either drag the “Image dropdown” to the side-bar then insert an image then add an affiliate link or, you can drag the “HTML dropdown” to the side-bar then insert the HTML (which already contains your affiliate link). I chose HTML because the image might slow down the site. 

      Hope this helps

      Sunny 🍺

      Reply
  61. I love this site! Great info on the behaviors of Dogs in general.
    Side note, the ads on CBD, I had no idea that there were CBD products for dogs…that one pic of the Dog and Cat looking like they were saying Whaaat? on the ad cracked me up.

    I can relate to the Anxious canine as I hear my neighbors dog barking alot and he sounds sad in his bark. They leave him alone alot, this makes me sad.

    I grew up with Black Labs and their social behavior was like part of the family so many things you teach us in this article were familiar from that standpoint.

    I used to behave like a dog when I was a kid and they seemed to accept me like that! (ok wierd)
    Seriously though, one of the older dogs used to make this huffing sound like he was sniffing and at first he did not like me much and would bristle but when I started immitating him he literally would smile at me! Dogs are amazing! I wish I could be more like them after all Dog is God spelled backwards!

    Sorry if I am going on and on but this was a great site and it sparked all that so nice work!
    I look forward to seeing more of your content in the future!
    ~Jason

    Reply
  62. I have always wondered why dogs love to smell one another’s bottoms, it just seems so weird to me as a human! Now that you have explained that and in total 5 such questions for me in this article, I feel closer to both my dogs, as I understand a bit more of why they act as they do.

    You mention the apocrine glands are located in different areas of a dog, and these provide lots of information the sniffer can tap into (and retain), but it seems convenience dictates they go for the bottom as the most convenient way to sniff away. Now I understand.

    The rest of the questions you answered were also ones that I have asked myself from time to time. Your answers make perfect sense and now I not only have them but I can share these tidbits with my fellow dog lovers in the neighborhood. This is a very interesting and informative post, thanks for making me a bit smarter today! 

    Reply
    • Hey Dave,

      I really appreciate your comment. Dogs sniff the butt because it’s a lot more accessible than the armpits. And you’re right, it’s weird to see this as a human and feels a little unsettling. Thanks for sharing this with dog owners in your neighborhood!

      Sunny

      Reply
  63. Hey, I enjoy a lot while reading your article on Dogs Smell Each Others Bottoms and find it very useful for dog lovers like me. You are really doing an awesome work by sharing your perfect guide on Dogs Smell Each Others Bottoms. Now I learn lots of new things regarding dogs. Now I know the reason after reading you post that Dogs naturally empty their anal glands whenever they do their business but sometimes they lose this ability.

    Reply
  64. This has surely been as educational as I initially anticipated. Dogs are very interesting creatures and their habitual way of living definitely makes for a great company. The question about why they tend to follow their owners to the toilet stands out boldly I must say. They instinctively know that it puts you in a vulnerable position, so it’s only natural for them to try to protect you. This is truly informative. I’m glad you shared 

    Reply
  65. Why do dogs smell each other, well Aprocine glands, never heard of that, makes sense that they are in the butt, armpits and crotch on humans, I had no idea that dogs through sniffing could get all the information, about gender and the other things you mentioned, but how do they know friend or foe, this always baffled me? I think the defending themselves is really what I see in my dog anyway, when he poops. Mine and my dogs preference is that we go to bed, and he has his spot and I have mine. I live alone, well besides my dog and cat, but they both sleep with me and it is wonderful. Great article, love this website so much, thanks again.

    Reply
    • Hello Bobbi, dogs learn through experience and association. As for your question on how they know if a dog is a friend or foe, they most likely remember the scent of a dog and associate it with a good or bad experience

      Sunny

      Reply
  66. If humans could smell each other’s butts and so weed out the bad apples, that would be quite something huh ๐Ÿ˜‰ One of my dogs always follows me to the bathroom when I take a shower. It seems as if he worries about me when I do that. He doesn’t mind when I give him a bath, so I’m not sure if he worries about me being exposed to water for such a long time, or perhaps it is like you mentioned in your article, he finds me in a vulnerable position and wants to look out or me. 

    I have four dogs, two of them sleep in their own beds on the floor. The other two sleep on the bed. We sleep all night, and they don’t wake me up. One of them, though, Tommeeh, tends to steal my blankets ๐Ÿ˜‰ And so sometimes I wake up at night to pull back my blankets. One of the dogs that sleeps in her bed on the floor, Lucy, is fourteen, and it is better for her to sleep in her own bed, just in case she has a little “accident”. The other one who also sleeps on the floor, Greta, had incontinence for years, that is why she has her own little bed. She seems to have no more incontinence now – not sure why, but I am not complaining ๐Ÿ˜‰ – but we are used to this arrangement now, so Greta stays on the floor. Two dogs in the bed is more than enough ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  67. I know the answer to the bottom sniffing the bottom. However the following you to the bathroom is interesting lol. I have a feeling that Shiro follows me to the bathroom is because he wants to protect and and also want to see me when I go. I thought the spin around before they go to the bathroom is just all their innate habits, now I know. Thank yo for sharing this! 

    Reply
  68. Jajajaja, this is such a fun facts list. The most interesting take away for me (and Tobby) is coming from the 3rd question: “Why Do Dogs Spin Around Before They Poop?” and we believe the orientation explanation is a very clever one!

    The second best for me; the question about bed-sharing (as it was one of the first marital discussions between my wife and me): We never allowed Tobby to come to our bet. He has plenty of space to play around all day long, and he’s not always supervised. Not knowing where he has been in our property could be a source of fear more than any bad thing coming from himself directly. He has access to our room and that seems to be enough for him (and good for us).

    Thanks for delivering a great, very interesting to read!

    Reply
  69. Oh my goodness, I thought I knew most of what there is to know about dogs, but your third point is new information to me. My dog does indeed spin around a lot before he poops, even in the privacy of our back garden, but now I think about it, he always ends up facing north or south. Well I never, I’ve learned something new! Thanks very much for sharing.

    Reply
  70. These questions are funny but at the same time very true. I think its funny to know that a dog follows its master to the bathroom thinking its an important territory. Well, the bathroom is important for dogs; right? You make perfect sense hen you say they have no privacy!

    Reply
    • Thanks for your comment, Linda. You are correct, the fact that they can walk around naked proves the point about not having a sense of privacy

      Sunny

      Reply
  71. I have learnt so much about dogs from your website and I really appreciate it. These are some things that have been revolving in my mind whenever I see dogs do them. Now I know why dogs smell stuffs. It’s so incredible to know that they get information from smells. This article is really helpful especially with the last question answered.

    You made me laugh when you said you can’t tell me how many times you almost fell off your bed. As for me, I’d prefer a dog sleeps in a crate. It’s much more safer for the dog and the owner.

    Reply
  72. Fantastic article Sonny.  I learnt more about dogs from your post than anywhere else, ever! And now that you have explained it all in simple terms, it all makes so much sense now.  We had a young pup that used to pee regularly whilst outside playing and we could never figure out whether it was an excitement or anxiety issue.  Thankfully the dog grew out of it but it always made us wonder with subsequent dogs if this was a normal thing as we never experienced it again.

    Thank you for all the great insight into our best friends.

    Reply
  73. Omg, I start laughing at the title. These are great questions that I could never understand very well. But what amazed me most, was the study made by the Germans. That dog’s poop north or south for location purposes. That’s mind blowing. And all this answers, made total sense when you remember all your dogs attitudes, like following you to the toilet. Great insight on a little bit more of our pets =) 

    And I’m not letting my dog sleep in my bed anymore! Maybe that’ll help to get through the night better! hahaha

    Thank you so much for this post. It was a very fun reading!

    Reply
    • Hello Marina,

      I know, imagine those Germans staring at pooping dogs while holding a compass. 

      Im very happy you enjoyed it 😊

      Sunny

      Reply
  74. This article was so awesome! I learned so much about why my dog does these things. It makes sense about why they follow you into the bathroom. I never thought of it that way. So here’s a question that I was hoping to find out and that is why do dogs eat their own feces? I have yet to find a useful answer. Thank you for sharing this information, it helps me to understand my pup even better.

    Reply
  75. This article was so awesome! I learned so much about why my dog does these things. It makes sense about why they follow you into the bathroom. I never thought of it that way. So here’s a question that I was hoping to find out and that is why do dogs eat their own feces? I have yet to find a useful answer. Thank you for sharing this information, it helps me to understand my pup even better.

    Reply
    • Hello Michell, I’m really glad you found this article useful.
      As per your question, dogs usually do this to hide the scent and keep predators away from their puppies. It’s in their genes. Thanks for bringing this up, I’ll add this to my next article.
      Have a great day!
      Sunny

      Reply

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